Celaya 25, Col. Hipódromo Condesa

2 Blocks West of Metrobus Sonora

HOURS

Mon-Sat 11am-6pm
Closed Sundays
New Titles Daily

Mission:

To establish: an embassy for the soul of the English-speaking world - its literature - in Mexico; an educational resource for Chilangos learning English and eager to explore the artistic reach of the language; a web-free, Kindle-less island of analog time in the digital sea; a community center for Commonwealth and American expatriates in the most exciting, vibrant and accessible city on Earth; an institution that will pay tribute to that city's magnificence with the best our native culture has to offer.

Contact:

Email Under the Volcano Books

Under The Volcano Books
Celaya 25
Col. Hipódromo Condesa
Distrito Federal
MEXICO C.P. 06100

The UTVB Blog

The Hot 100

March 16, 2016

Get 70 pesos cash or 100 pesos credit for these titles until our (delayed) spring book run.

1. Selected Poems, by Malcolm Lowry
2. Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates
3. My Sister’s Hand in Mine: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles, by Jane Bowles
4. Gravity’s Rainbow, by Thomas Pynchon
5. A Brief History of Seven Killings, by Marlon James
6. The Savage Detectives, by Roberto Bolaño
7. The Mexico City Reader, edited by Ruben Gallo
8. Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
9. First Stop in the New World, by David Lida
10. Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro
11. Stoner, by John Williams
12. NW, by Zadie Smith
13. Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace
14. The Crying of Lot 49, by Thomas Pynchon
15. Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
16. The Labyrinth of Solitude, by Octavio Paz
17. Just Kids, by Patti Smith
18. The Neapolitan Tetralogy 1 & 2, by Elena Ferrante
19. White Teeth, by Zadie Smith
20. Collected Stories, by Claire Lispector
21. 2666, by Roberto Bolaño
22. The Changing Light at Sandover, by James Merrill
23. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway
24. Collected Fictions, by Jorge Luis Borges
25. A Frolic of His Own, by William Gaddis
26. Voices From Chernobyl, by Svetlana Alexievich
27. U.S.A. Trilogy, by John Dos Passos
28. Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy
29. Where I’m Calling From, by Raymond Carver
30. Collected Stories, by John Cheever
31. Middlemarch, by George Eliot
32. White Noise, by Don deLillo
33. The Maturin Novels, by Edward St. Aubyn
34. Sabbath’s Theater, by Philip Roth
35. The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath
36. The Pale King, by David Foster Wallace
37. Force Majeure, by Bruce Wagner
38. The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin
39. Jesus’ Son, by Denis Johnson
40. Selected Poems, by Ezra Pound
41. The Buried Giant, by Kazuo Ishiguro
42. Less Than Zero, by Bret Easton Ellis
43. Disgrace, by J.M. Coetzee
44. The Romantic Dogs, by Roberto Bolaño
45. Tears of the True Policeman, by Roberto Bolaño
46. Breaking and Entering, by Joy Williams
47. On the Road, by Jack Kerouac
48. Journey to the End of the Night, by Louis-Ferdinand Celine
49. The Sheltering Sky, by Paul Bowles
50. Ariel, by Sylvia Plath
51. Mexico City Blues, by Jack Kerouac
52. Collected Poems, by Philip Larkin
53. Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
54. Carpenter’s Gothic, by William Gaddis
55. Independent People, by Halldor Laxness
56. Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse
57. Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen
58. Submission, by Michel Houellebecq
59. The White Album, by Joan Didion
60. Blueprints of the Afterlife, by Ryan Boudinot
61. J.R., by William Gaddis
62. A Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole
63. The Sellout, by Paul Beatty
64. Fiskadoro, by Denis Johnson
65. Ada, by Vladimir Nabokov
66. Slouching Towards Bethlehem, by Joan Didion
67. The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick
68. Final Harvest: Poems, by Emily Dickinson
69. El Narco, by Ioan Grillo
70. Aunt Dan and Lemon and The Fever, by Wallace Shawn
71. The Dream Songs, by John Berryman
72. A Void, by Georges Perec
73. Loitering, by Charles D’Ambrosio
74. Dracula, by Bram Stoker
75. The Butterfly Stories, by William T. Vollmann
76. War Music, by Christopher Logue
77. Platform, by Michel Houellebecq
78. The Eye in the Door, by Pat Barker
79. Helter Skelter, by Vincent Bugliosi
80. El Monstruo, by John Ross
81. My Struggle (1-5), by Karl Ove Knausgaard
82. Midnight in Mexico, by Alfredo Corchado
83. Daniel Deronda, by George Eliot
84. The Gormenghast Trilogy, by Mervyn Peake
85. Girl With Curious Hair, by David Foster Wallace
86. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, by Philip K. Dick
87. The Colour Out of Space, by H.P. Lovecraft
88. IQ84, by Haruki Murakami
89. The Seven Dreams Novels, by William T. Vollmann
90. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
91. The Songlines, by Bruce Chatwin
92. Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene
93. Europe Central, by William T. Vollmann
94. The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury
95. Purity, by Jonathan Franzen
96. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
97. The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner
98. By Night in Chile, by Roberto Bolaño
99. Collected Poems, by Allen Ginsberg
100. The Ghost Ship, by B. Traven

Latest Event

Devil’s Night II

Devil’s Night II
Saturday, October 31st 8 PM

Join us for our second annual SATANIC HALLOWE’EN party – no cover, but costumes are compulsory – and poets are declaiming their spookiest, most devilish work.

Dylan Brennan is the best new young poet I’ve read in many years. He’s an Irish immgrant, deeply immersed in the dark manifestations of contemporary Mexican life. Get ahold of his book, Blood Oranges, published by thepennydreadful.org, if you possibly can. He’ll be reading from an unpublished poem, EXORCISMO MAGNO, based on a strange and real event, an exorcism performed at the Vatican to cleanse the entire country of Mexico of demons.

Tim MacGabhann’s work can be found at MexicoCityLit.com. He has been a local stringer for the Irish Times and Al Jazeera. He presents a new poem, LA SANTA MUERTE.

Alejandro Mayagoitia is a local poet writing in Spanish who eschews publication for live oratory. His terrific, quiet and disquieting cycle of gay love poetry, VAMPIRICAS, will come out of the coffin for its debut at this event.

MC Vomitus Berzerkus has dabbled in the occult since losing his soul to Satan on a bet he could balance on a curb in Southern California when he was nine years old. In 2008 he provoked the interdimensional vengeance of Shub-Niggurath, “The Goat with 10,000 Young”, and sought refuge in the land of birrerias.